• “[T]he unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people.” ~Tench Coxe (1788)
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Published in: on October 28, 2016 at 1:29 am  Leave a Comment  

  • “As our president bears no resemblance to a king so we shall see the Senate has no similitude to nobles. First, not being hereditary, their collective knowledge, wisdom, and virtue are not precarious. For by these qualities alone are they to obtain their offices, and they will have none of the peculiar qualities and vices of those men who possess power merely because their father held it before them.” ~Tench Coxe, An American Citizen, No. 2, 1787
Published in: on June 7, 2016 at 10:27 pm  Leave a Comment  

  • “Who are the militia? Are they not ourselves? It is feared, then, that we shall turn our arms each man against his own bosom. Congress have no power to disarm the militia. Their swords, and every other terrible implement of the soldier, are the birthright of an American… [T]he unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people.” ~Tench Coxe, The Pennsylvania Gazette, 1788
Published in: on July 11, 2013 at 7:14 am  Comments (3)  

  • “As our president bears no resemblance to a king so we shall see the Senate has no similitude to nobles. First, not being hereditary, their collective knowledge, wisdom, and virtue are not precarious. For by these qualities alone are they to obtain their offices, and they will have none of the peculiar qualities and vices of those men who possess power merely because their father held it before them.” ~Tench Coxe, An American Citizen, No. 2, 1787
Published in: on December 17, 2012 at 10:21 am  Leave a Comment  

Regarding Our President and The Senate . . .

  • “As our president bears no resemblance to a king so we shall see the Senate has no similitude to nobles. First, not being hereditary, their collective knowledge, wisdom, and virtue are not precarious. For by these qualities alone are they to obtain their offices, and they will have none of the peculiar qualities and vices of those men who possess power merely because their father held it before them.” —Tench Coxe, An American Citizen, No. 2, 1787
Published in: on July 13, 2011 at 5:05 pm  Leave a Comment